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It is a small muscle, so your dont have to work it EXTREMELEY hard for resuts, but if your into extreme bodybuilding, then you should. I suggest doing different grips, speeds, sets, weights..ext for each exercise you do. SO, your first exercise is pullups. DO one set to failure. Next is concentration curls. DO 3 sets, 6-8 reps. THen comes hammer curls. Perform 2 sets of 20-25 reps. DO something along those lines, and the biceps will grow. I have 8 workouts for my biceps. 3 of them i perform each bicep training session. The others, I rotate. For biceps, I prefer supersets for great pump and growth.

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It's difficult to give a real direct answer to this because so much depends on genetics. I've seen many bodybuilders who do not need to do much direct bicep work to make them grow, while others, such as those with long arms, bad insertion points...etc, have more difficulty turning those pea shooters into cannons.
You can either train your biceps with greater frequency, several times a week but only doing 1 or 2 exercises totaling 7 +/- 1 sets each time you do biceps, or you can emphasize volume and train them 1 or maybe twice per week using a max of 20 sets per session.
They key to great biceps, as well as any other muscle is the intensity with which you train. Forgive me for doing this, but I am going to use myself as an example. I train biceps 3 times every two weeks and each time I only use 1 exercise and perform only 1 real working set. The training program I follow is called Doggcrapp training and is purely about intensity. That 1 set is an all-out set, using rest-pauses and finishing with static contractions. This has worked incredibly well for me and several others who follow this training style. All that matters is that you have placed a stimulus on the muscle that is beyond what is has experienced previously and will force the muscle to adapt to the new stimulus by becoming stronger. This can be done by changing rep schemes, exercises, frequencies, training methods (negatives, half-reps, drop-sets...etc). Your goal is to create fatigue, not annihilate you muscles.
Experiment with breaking up your biceps workout into two separate workouts and trying some new techniques.
I'd be glad to help you put something together.